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Gazing Into Zen in Las Vegas | UNLV

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The Abstract Mandalas of UNLV Alumnus James Stanford Demand Close Inspection. A New Art Book Collects His Works.


Rather than seeing Las Vegas as culturally vacant, James Stanford looks around him and sees artistic opportunity.

One of the UNLV alumnus’ endeavors involves taking photographs of many of Las Vegas’ iconic neon signs and architecture and using them as the basis of new works of art.

After years of photographing such images, Stanford began using his graphic arts skills to turn those photographs into mandalas, which he describes as visual works of art that take you into higher consciousness.

He describes his work as “complex and meditative.”

He said he “opens his mind to meditation and asks the universe, ‘What is going on here?’ (The answer) seems to be revealed through my work.” > Read More

PORTALS: New Pop-up Art Exhibit Transforms Vegas Photos Into Digital Mosaics | News3LV

James Stanford PORTALS Installation

A new pop-up art installation, PORTALS, showcases an illuminated view of the complex photomontages of the valley’s landmarks and neon signs.

Artist James Stanford’s backlit lenticulars (images that appear to change as the viewer's head moves) will be on display through Monday, Jan. 31, along Charleston Boulevard and Main Street in the downtown Arts District.

Several of the pieces can be found in the vacant storefront windows on the Quivx Building, located at 1 E. Charleston Boulevard. > Read More

Source: https://news3lv.com/news/things-to-do/port...

Artistic Endeavors: James Stanford's Mandalas | The Snarky Quilter

Architectura Circulo

Architectura Circulo

It has been described as the intersection of Las Vegas and Buddhism. The digital images are intricate, detail-dense, neatly symmetrical, abstract, mandala-like. Most often they’re layers of details cropped from historic photos of Vegas signage and architecture.

Stanford uses the iconic vintage signage of Las Vegas, where he spent his childhood at a time when the town was small and provincial, without access to global culture. His layered images reflect a mirrored geometry that unravels and then recomposes. > Read More